Posted by: Omar C. Garcia | August 23, 2011

9/11 Tribute Movement

Like most Americans I will never forget where I was on the morning of September 11, 2001. While driving down Irving Boulevard in Irving, Texas I listened to the news report about a plane that had crashed into one of the Twin Towers in Manhattan. My interest was immediately piqued because I had visited the towers on two occasions in previous years. Later that morning I watched the television report about the second plane that had crashed into the second tower. I stood in front of that television silent and in stunned disbelief. I had a sick feeling in my gut that the world had suddenly changed before my very eyes. I was scheduled to fly to Bangladesh later that week but had to postpone my trip because flights were cancelled in the wake of this national tragedy. And, in the days that followed, the skies over Dallas and Fort Worth were eerily silent because no planes were flying into or out of DFW and Love Field, the two airports near our home.

In a few weeks we will observe the tenth anniversary of the terrorist attacks of September 11 — an opportunity for each of us to reflect deeply on the events of that terrible day. We owe it to the nearly 3,000 civilians and civil servants who lost their lives in those terrorist attacks to never allow the events of that day to fade from our collective national consciousness. Osama Bin Laden certainly did not forget. A cursory examination of the evidence seized after his death indicated that Bin Laden and other senior Al Queda leaders were communicating about possible terrorist attacks on the tenth anniversary of 9/11. The terrorist attacks of 9/11 showed us the worst that those who hate America can do. But these attacks also revealed what is best about America as people from all walks of life rallied together to help.

On the upcoming tenth anniversary of 9/11, we will have an opportunity to show the world what is best about America. A non-profit organization called MyGoodDeed is partnering with Hands-On Network to co-lead efforts to organize the single largest day of charitable service in United States history. David Paine, the co-founder and President of MyGoodDeed said, “Collectively, through our positive actions that help others in need, we will create a remarkable and lasting tribute to those we lost on 9/11, and demonstrate emphatically that goodness ultimately wins over evil.” Learn more about how you can join the 9/11 Tribute Movement by visiting 911day.org. Prayerfully consider what you and your family will do to pay tribute to the victims and survivors of 9/11. You can read about what others plan to do and also register your good deed at this site.

The Apostle Paul wrote, “Do not be overcome by evil, but overcome evil with good” (Romans 12:21). To take revenge or to repay evil with evil makes us indistinguishable from those who unleashed their destructive acts of terror on our country. However, if we “hate what is evil” and “cling to what is good” (Romans 12:9), we can indeed overcome evil. Hating what is evil calls for emotional involvement and clinging to what is good calls for energetic and intentional action. I hope that between today and September 11 you will prayerfully consider what you will do to take part in this national opportunity to overcome evil with good.


Responses

  1. Great article….

    Jim

    • Thanks, Jim. What a great way to honor those who lost their lives on 9/11 and who risked their lives to save others. I pray that initiative indeed results in the greatest outpouring of volunteers in the history of our country.


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