Posted by: Omar C. Garcia | August 14, 2019

To My New Granddaughter

My Dearest Little Bethany,

Welcome to our family — your family. Your arrival yesterday afternoon was much anticipated. As much as I like and use words, there really are none to describe what I felt when I saw you for the first time. Tears of joy was the only language I could resort to. And that’s ok because you don’t need words to speak or understand the language of joy.


I want you to know that you have an amazing mom and dad who loved you from the moment you were conceived. And when they shared the news that you were growing inside your mom, the circle of those who love you grew even wider. We prayed for you daily and tracked your progress, longing for the day of your arrival.


You are so blessed to have a mom and dad who love each other deeply. I was present when your mom was born. Things got a little tense in labor and delivery and the doctor decided that your mom needed to get here quicker — so he performed an emergency C-section. Those same tears of joy filled my eyes the moment I saw your mom for the first time.

Your dad is one of the bravest men I know. He is a twin. You will meet your Uncle Christopher soon. He and Christopher were born under some stressful circumstances as well. In fact, they were both so small at birth that your birth weight was more than theirs combined. Since then, your dad has endured a lot of surgeries. He has faced every one with great courage.


When your mom and dad met, Gigi (that’s your grandmother) and I knew that they belonged together. We were thrilled when they fell in love and then got married. We knew that one day they would have children. On their first attempt they suffered a miscarriage. And although we never had the opportunity to meet that child, we believe that one day we will. We now have one more compelling reason why we long for heaven.


And then God gave us you. We actually got our first look at you while you were still in your mother’s womb. Those sonogram pics were the best. They gave us a peek into what God was doing. And, like your beautiful cousin Mila who was born six-months ago today, those sonogram pics affirmed that God had already crowned you with dignity and beauty. You not only bear resemblances to your mom and dad — you are made in God’s image.

Mila and Bethany on Day 1 | Six months apart

You have so many family members who can’t wait to meet you and to hold you and to kiss you. You will meet them all in due time, including Mila. I know that you and Mila will become good friends and share a lifetime together. In the meantime, Gigi and I look forward to every moment we will spend with you. You are and will always be loved.


By the way, it was fun helping your mom and dad prepare your nursery over the past few months. Your mom and dad placed a beautiful blessing from the Old Testament book of Numbers (6:24-26) on your wall. It pretty much sums up how we all feel about you — “May the Lord bless you and keep you. May His face shine on you, and be gracious to you; may He show you His favor and give you peace.”

I love you always, Bethany.

Your Pops

Posted by: Omar C. Garcia | August 12, 2019

Kids Need Dads

As we continue trying to make sense of the senseless shootings of recent weeks, we must not overlook the truth that strong families are the first line of defense in preventing children from becoming the kind of adults who spiral out of control and end up harming others. Further, we must not overlook the fact that the presence of a father in the home is of far more importance than our society is willing to admit.


As our political leaders continue fixing blame (mostly on one another) very little is being said about the fact that of the 27 deadliest mass shooters of recent years, the majority are men who came from broken homes — mostly homes without the presence of a good, stable father. Boys who do not grow up with a father who models self-control and empathy toward others are especially vulnerable to ideas that can sweep them in the direction of anger and violence.

That said, most boys who grow up in fatherless homes pick up the right cues from other adult males in their lives — a teacher, coach, uncle, or grandfather. But, many do not.

On Father’s Day in 2008, then Senator Barak Obama gave a speech in which he said, “Of all the rocks upon which we build our lives … family is the most important. And we are called to recognize and honor how critical every father is to that foundation.” I agree with that. The best environment for a child is a home with a dad who is present and involved in the lives of his children. I remember the days when liberals and conservatives both agreed on this one thing — kids need dads!

Sadly, political winds (even under Obama’s administration) shifted and now bluster for a new definition of the family, a new category that either excludes the presence of a mom or a dad. Growing up with two dads means that a child grows up without a mom. Growing up with two moms means that a child grows up without a dad. In the current political climate, those who disagree with this paradigm are quickly labeled as intolerant and haters.

The truth is that we cannot yet fathom where the social and moral consequences of this new parenting category will ultimately lead us. Deliberately trying to create homes that are either fatherless or motherless is not a good idea. I believe in traditional marriage and want to see strong homes where moms and dads are the primary faith trainers of their children. As a Christ-follower, I unashamedly embrace the biblical model for the family.

As we debate gun violence, laws that govern the purchase of guns, and the role of mental health in mass shootings, we must not overlook the connection between violence and broken homes, especially homes with absentee dads. Harvard sociologist Robert Sampson observed, “Family structure is one of the strongest, if not the strongest, predictor of variations in urban violence across cities in the United States.”

If we fail to fix broken homes, then no legislation will do enough to keep us safe. If fathers fail to take responsibility for their homes and to model good behavior, then boys may likely be more susceptible to ideas that will lead them down harmful paths. On Father’s Day of this year, my friend Brad Flurry said in his sermon, “It’s much easier to prepare a boy than to repair a man!” Well said.

Dads, understand how important you are to your family. Take responsibility. Teach, correct, and love your children. Be present when you are present. Do this because kids need dads!

Posted by: Omar C. Garcia | August 6, 2019

The El Paso Challenge

It has happened again. This time two mass shootings in two days. Incidences of violence like these now occur with enough frequency that while they evoke anger and outrage they no longer surprise us. That, in itself, is sad. And, because of our connected world, as soon as the bullets stop flying then politicians and pundits start firing blame.

Assigning blame does nothing to assuage the grief of those who have suffered unimaginable loss. And it has done nothing to stop the violence. According to USA Today, the El Paso and Dayton shootings make for 251 mass shootings since the first of the year. These shootings have claimed more than 520 lives and injured close to 2000 people.

The reality is that today there are families that are hurting in a way far deeper than the rest of us. Their lives have been turned upside down. While they grieve, collectively we are all asking why. We all want answers. We demand solutions. When Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine tried to offer comfort at a vigil following the deadly shooting in Dayton, the crowd repeatedly shouted, “Do something!”

Do something, indeed! But what? Democratic US Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio said that our “thoughts and prayers are not enough.” He may have a point. Unless we are willing to do more than pray but to also consider how God might use us as the answer to our own prayers then nothing much will change. And thoughts that do not lead to some type of intentional and compassionate actions also do little to help.


In the midst of all this, one eleven year old boy from El Paso wanted to do something to help his grieving community move toward healing. After giving the matter some thought, Ruben Martinez approached his mother Rose with a practical idea — challenging the people of his community to do one random act of kindness for every life lost in the shooting that rocked his community and our nation.


Rose posted her son’s challenge on social media and the rest is history. Ruben’s challenge has now reached much farther than the city limits of the West Texas town of El Paso. National news outlets picked up the story. Ruben’s idea quickly resonated with so many around the nation who care and who want to do something. This is a practical “do something” that any of us can and should do. A simple but powerful idea — random acts of kindness to counter random acts of violence.

Imagine what could happen if each of us expressed kindness to those whom God puts in our path — regardless of the color of their skin or their religious or political leanings. While the El Paso Challenge will not stop future mass shootings, it may just be the thing that gets someone inclined toward hurting others to think again. People who hurt, it seems, tend to hurt others. We should never minimize how God might use a random act of kindness to impact a confused and hurting individual.

Thank you, Ruben, for reminding us all to do good in the wake of great evil. I accept your challenge.

Posted by: Omar C. Garcia | July 17, 2019

Determined To Do Their Duty

John R. Mott is one of my historical mentors. A historical mentor is someone who, although dead, continues to influence succeeding generations through writings and a life well-lived. Born in 1865, Mott became a believer at a young age. While a sophomore at Cornell University, J.K. Studd, one of Mott’s professors, said to him, “Young man, seekest thou great things for thyself? Seek them not! Seek ye first the kingdom of God.”


Studd’s words pierced Mott’s heart and kept him up that night. His conversation with Studd changed the course of his life. Mott later became the leader of the Student Volunteer Movement for Foreign Missions, an organization that sought to mobilize college students to take the gospel to the ends of the earth. Mott led this movement for thirty years and was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1946 for his work in international church and missionary movements.

In April 1901, Mott spoke on the responsibility of young people for the evangelization of the world. In this speech, Mott said, “The last command of Christ is operative until it is repealed. It is not optional, as some would assume, but obligatory. It awaits its fulfillment by a generation which shall have the requisite faith and courage, and audacity and the purpose of heart to do their duty to the whole world.”

The reality is that each of us are stewards of our own generation — essentially a narrow slice of time in which to serve God’s purpose. After that, we die and return to dust. However, what we do in our generation does not have to die with us if we will own and responsibly serve God’s purposes while we have opportunity.

In a sermon that Paul preached on his first missionary journey, he said, ”Now when David had served God’s purpose in his own generation, he fell asleep; he was buried with his ancestors and his body decayed.” (Acts 13:36). But, what David did in his generation impacted the course of redemptive history because he served the purpose of God.


One way in which we can impact the course of redemptive history is by investing in the next generation. By so doing we help to ensure “that the generation to come might know” (Ps. 78:6) God and understand His purposes in the world. In the words of Mott, we must teach and encourage the successive generation “to do their duty to the whole world.”


One of the best things we do at Kingsland is to invest in ministry interns — young people who have expressed an interest in serving and learning about all-things ministry. Mentoring and encouraging those who will take the reins of ministry long after we are gone is strategic in the work of the kingdom.


I have been privileged to have nine summer missions interns, including one from India and another from El Salvador. Our interns began their summer by visiting with several of our local ministry partners in order to gain greater insight into the value of strategic partnerships in order to reach our community for Christ. They have learned a lot about what it takes to make each ministry work and how they utilize volunteers.


Six of my interns spent the month of June in Alaska working with our partner, Grace Works Alaska. The other interns served in a variety of capacities with our local partners. We have enjoyed debriefing sessions, lots of questions and answers, and talking about various aspects of ministry. Each of our interns served and learned well and made meaningful discoveries about what it means to serve God.


Our summer internship ends on July 31. I will miss our interns but am excited about how God will continue to use them as they return to their respective college campuses and places of employment. I appreciate their passion and willingness to serve and their determination “to do their duty to the whole world.”

Posted by: Omar C. Garcia | July 10, 2019

Where Jesus Walked

I have returned to the land where Jesus walked — this time with more than seventy students and adults. We are on a pilgrimage of sorts, here to learn about the context in which our biblical worldview unfolded.


There is something powerful about a pilgrimage. Being onsite impacts insight. The stories in the Bible happened in an actual geographical, historical, and cultural context. Understanding the context in which the stories recorded in the Scriptures happened is eye-opening and affirming.


We began our pilgrimage at the Sea of Galilee. The ancient rabbis used to say, “Jehovah hath created seven seas, but the Sea of Galilee is His delight.” Most of the ministry of Jesus happened in and around the shores of this lake that lies almost 700 feet below sea level. He performed many miracles here.


Capernaum, the place Jesus chose as His base of operations when He began His ministry, was our first stop. Both Matthew and Mark referred to this town as Jesus’ home. And yet, the people of Capernaum did not accept Jesus’ messianic role. They failed to embrace who He is and why He came (read Matthew 11:23-24). Like the people of Capernaum, many people today miss Jesus.


After walking among the ruins of Capernaum, we traveled by boat across the Sea of Galilee to Tiberius. From the middle of the lake we could see most of the places where Jesus conducted His earthly ministry. We also enjoyed a time of worship and sang songs about the beauty of Jesus.


After a visit to Caesarea Philippi, we continued our adventure by rafting on the Jordan River. But best of all, we conducted a baptismal service at the Jordan River. When John baptized Jesus, God spoke and affirmed His love for His Son. After His baptism, Jesus retreated to the wilderness where He was tempted. After the baptism came the battle and after the voice from heaven came the roar from hell.


Our adventure of discovery also took us to the Temple Mount, the holiest site in Judaism. The Old Testament book of 2 Chronicles identifies this location as Mount Moriah (3:1), the place where Abraham had been willing to offer Isaac (Gen. 22:1-14). While in this area we also learned about the various gates around the Temple Mount.


While in Jerusalem we visited the Garden of Gethsemane. The olive trees at the Garden of Gethsemane are old — so old, in fact, that they may actually date back to the time of Jesus. The Garden of Gethsemane is the place where Judas betrayed Jesus with a kiss and where Peter cut off the right ear of Malchus, the slave of the high priest.



Our students also visited and prayed at the Church of All Nations which claims to be built atop the site where Jesus prayed on the night before His crucifixion. This was an emotional stop for many of our students, a reminder that while we were yet sinners Christ died for us.


Our visit to Bethlehem was a highlight. We visited the Shepherd’s Field and also walked to the top of the Herodium, Herod’s magnificent palace. From that high vantage point we could look down toward the humble place of Jesus’ birth. We visited the Church of the Nativity and sang O Holy Night at this place where tradition says Jesus was born.


Jericho is regarded as the oldest city on the planet. It’s also the place where walls came tumbling down as Joshua led the children of Israel into the Promised Land and where Jesus ate a meal at the home of a tax-collector named Zacchaeus. This remains a fascinating site rich in history. We had a great time exploring the ancient tel at this location.



Today, our students hiked to the waterfalls of Ein Gedi, stood atop Masada, and floated on the Dead Sea. They learned about the refreshing living water of Ein Gedi, the remarkable and heart-breaking story of the Jews who made a last stance against the Romans atop the fortress of Masada, and enjoyed floating on the Dead Sea.


Our adventure continues. So much more to see and do in this remarkable place. We are taking advantage of every moment to deepen our understanding of our worldview. My prayer is that, as a result of this pilgrimage, our students will be strengthened in their faith and will determine to live according to our biblical worldview.

Posted by: Omar C. Garcia | June 24, 2019

Kids Changing the World

A key component of our missions ministry is equipping the next generation to do their part to make our world a better place. This means doing practical things to address urgent needs around the globe and giving others an opportunity to hear about Jesus. We want our kids to understand that they do not have to wait until they grow up to help change the world. God can use them to do so today.

Every summer, we encourage the kids who attend our Vacation Bible School to give a daily offering that we invest in helping kids in need. We also educate our kids to understand the challenges faced by those they are helping. Over the past years our kids have supported initiatives to help kids in Mongolia, India, Cambodia, El Salvador, Honduras, Egypt, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Last year they raised funds to drill six new water wells in poor villages around the world.


This summer we challenged our kids to raise funds to help start construction of a new primary school in the slums of Kawempe, a division of Kampala, Uganda. For the past thirteen years, our missions ministry has had a strategic partnership with Pastor Robert Nabulere and his wife Rose. These valued friends and partners saw a need among children in Kawempe and moved in the direction of that need.

Pastor Robert and Rose were burdened by the numbers of poor children in Kawempe who could not afford to go to school and decided to do something about it. So, they started the Miracle Destiny School with an initial enrollment of 16 kids. Today, they have almost 500 children enrolled in their schools.


The primary school has met in rented facilities from the start. God, however, provided a piece of property on which to construct a new school building for the elementary aged kids. We knew that this was the time for us to help Pastor Robert get this project started and challenged our kids to raise funds to make it happen.



Our missions ministry provided each child who attended VBS with their own Go Beyond Kids Explorers Club kit. Each kit contains information and interactive activities to help our kids learn about Uganda and the need for the new building for Miracle Destiny School. I wrote another kids book to tell the story of the school. Amy Redhair, my intern, did an outstanding job of illustrating the book.


Once again, our kids met the challenge. They exceeded their $15,000 offering goal and, with a matching gift from our missions ministry, raised a total of $32,561.74. These funds will help kickoff construction of a new four-story building in Kawempe to house classrooms for more than 260 elementary school students. We presented our gift to Pastor Robert at all of our services on both campuses on Sunday morning. He was beyond thrilled and grateful.


I am grateful for our kids and all who served in our VBS. We had an outstanding team of volunteers who helped guide and encourage our kids. And, once again, our kids have done something special to make the world better for kids in the slums of Kawempe.

In the words of the Apostle Paul to Timothy, his young protégé, “You are young, but don’t let anyone treat you as if you are not important. Be an example to show the believers how they should live. Show them by what you say, by the way you live, by your love, by your faith, and by your pure life” (1 Timothy 4:12). Thank you, Kingsland kids, for your generous gift and your great example.

Posted by: Omar C. Garcia | June 13, 2019

With Men I Respect

I have been a fan of western movies for as long as I can remember. So, when the remake of The Magnificent Seven hit the screen, I had to see it. The gist of the story is the same. Denzel Washington plays the role of Sam Chisolm, a bounty hunter hired by the good folks of Rose Creek to save their town from Bartholomew Bogue, the greedy industrialist.

My favorite line in the movie is spoken by the character Jack Horne, a tough frontiersman played by Vincent D’Onofrio. At a critical point in the fight against Bogue, Horne looks at his comrades and says, “To be in the service of others, with men I respect, like you all, I shouldn’t have to ask for more than that.”

Horne’s words pretty much sum up how I feel about my Band of Fathers, the group of men I have met with for the past four years. When I started the group, I invited men interested in becoming better dads to join me. I structured our group around three key components: shared study, shared mission, and shared adventure.


We regularly meet for shared study on Wednesday evenings around a meal. We have studied and discussed top selling Christian books on fatherhood as well as books about epic historical achievements in the realm of adventure and exploration. But we feel strongly that it takes more than shared study to become a better man and a better dad.

We burn off our shared study calories by holding one another accountable for practicing what we study, but also by engaging in shared mission. Serving others is essential to good spiritual formation. We want to move in the direction of people in need and to be the hands and feet of Jesus.


This month, we have spent several days helping a precious lady who is battling cancer. Battling a giant like cancer is bad enough without adding to that some nagging home repairs. So, our guys stepped up to help. We enjoy serving together and the fellowship that comes with working shoulder to shoulder to get a job done.


When our friend saw the great work that our guys had done, she told me that we were an answer to her prayers. I told her that we love being the answer to prayers. There is perhaps no greater privilege than serving God. And, that the God of the universe would allow us to serve Him is indeed a blessing.


Our Band of Fathers also enjoy shared adventure. We have hiked, camped, canoed, and biked together. This week we met for a meal around a campfire with nothing particular on the agenda but to enjoy fellowship. We ate. We laughed. We told stories around the fire. We did some target practice. We left satisfied that we were in good company and grateful to be doing life in community because alone is dangerous.


I am grateful for Kingsland’s Men’s Ministry and for the leadership of Gil Harris, men’s ministry director. Our missions and men’s ministries have collaborated to do some good work in the community. Gil has led our men to reach and mentor boys in the Brookshire Community — an initiative that is making a difference in the lives of many young men.

The best antidote to men being passive and bored is to engage in shared study, shared mission, and shared adventure. When men do life in community with other men, only then do they discover the truth of Jack Horne’s words.

Posted by: Omar C. Garcia | May 29, 2019

My Bible Notes Website

Prior to coming to faith in Christ as a teenager, a friend in my Algebra class had given me a copy of the New Testament. I knew absolutely nothing about the Bible or how it was arranged. I only understood that it was an important book. That very night I opened the pages of the New Testament and started to read the Bible for the first time.

What I read about Jesus touched me deeply. I underlined, highlighted, and took notes in the margins of my paperback New Testament. I repeated this ritual every night until I had read through the New Testament — only to be convinced that there was something missing in my life.

A short time later I attended a youth gathering at the high school stadium in my town. Norm Evans, a football player with the Miami Dolphins, was the speaker. He clearly explained why Jesus had come and why we should place our faith in Him for salvation. That night, I did just that and my life has never been the same.

As a new believer, the Bible became very important to me. I made time every day to read and study the Scriptures. I ordered a set of Scripture memory cards from the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association and learned to memorize Scripture. Since then I have committed many verses and entire chapters of Scripture to memory.

When I started my journey into full time ministry in 1978, leading Bible studies and working with teachers became a key part of my ministry. For the next twenty-seven years, I led weekly faculty meetings to help teachers prepare their lessons for Sunday.

In the mid-1990’s, the late Dr. Tommy Lea, then Dean of the School of Theology at Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary, introduced me to some of the editors at what was then the Baptist Sunday School Board, later renamed LifeWay Christian Resources. And so began my journey as a writer for LifeWay.

Over the years I was privileged to have more than two-hundred lessons and articles published by LifeWay. Working with LifeWay’s editors was one of the most enriching experiences of my Christian walk. I am grateful for that long season of writing and how God used it to deepen my study and understanding of the Scriptures.


In 2001, a friend encouraged me to start a website for Sunday School teachers and helped me to post my faculty notes on the site. That was the start of my Bible Teaching Notes website where I posted my exegetical research notes, charts, illustrations, and other resources for those who lead small groups.

A few months ago I started the process of moving my notes to a new site and am only a few hundred pages away from finishing that task. I try to add a few pages every night. However, my new site is now up and running. If you teach a small group or just enjoy reading the Scriptures, you should find something on the site to enrich your study.

I hope you will visit and look around my updated Bible Teaching Notes site and visit often. If you don’t find exegetical notes on the passage you are studying, that’s because this is a project that will take me a lifetime to complete. So check back often because I continue to add content every week.

May God bless you in your study of His Word and in taking intentional steps to strengthen your biblical worldview. And remember, we will not graduate from Bible study until we meet the Author face to face.

Posted by: Omar C. Garcia | May 27, 2019

On Memorial Day

Today, Americans around the country will visit monuments and cemeteries to honor those who paid the ultimate price for the freedoms we enjoy. Many of us will fire up our barbecue grills, go to parks for family picnics, or simply enjoy a relaxing day off. Whatever you do on Memorial Day, please be sure to set aside some time to help your children and grandchildren understand the reason we observe Memorial Day.

M= Meaning | We observe Memorial Day on the last Monday in May. Teach your children the meaning of Memorial Day — the day we remember those who gave their lives fighting for our freedom.

E = Educate | Teach your children and grandchildren about your personal family military history. Tell them about family members who served in the military and any who lost their lives while serving.

M = Mount | Mount an American flag in your yard or purchase several small American flags and place them on the graves of soldiers at a local cemetery. Buy small flags to give to neighbors.

O = Ownership | Take ownership of Memorial Day even if no one in your family has served in the military. The men and women who gave their lives did so to secure your freedoms. Honor them by observing Memorial Day.

R = Reach | Reach out to a family who lost a loved one in military service. Perhaps you can write a letter to a family who lost a son or daughter or place a flag and flowers upon their grave.

I = Internet | Search the internet for information on Memorial Day. Visit the Vietnam Memorial online or other sites to help your children learn about the sacrifices made by others for our freedom.

A = Ask | Ask God to continue to bless America. Pray for the families of those who have lost loved ones in military service. Pray for those presently serving in our armed forces.

L = Live | Encourage your children to live each day with gratitude and appreciation for the freedoms we enjoy. Purpose that you will not take this precious freedom for granted.

Posted by: Omar C. Garcia | May 15, 2019

A Split-Second Decision

The most significant moments of our lives seldom present themselves at a convenient time. We rarely receive any warning that our lives will intersect with a moment so extraordinary or unexpected that it alters the course of our lives — and that of others.

Tuesday, May 7, started out just like any other day for Kendrick Castillo and his friends Joshua Jones and Brendan Bialy. The three friends attend a Denver area STEM school located eight miles from Columbine High School, the site of the 1999 mass shooting that claimed thirteen lives and wounded more than twenty others.

On Tuesday, two other students entered the school with the intention of doing harm. Devon Erickson and Alec McKinney managed to make it deep inside the school without raising any suspicions. One of these shooters entered the classroom where Kendrick and his friends were studying and warned, “Nobody move.”


In a split-second, Kendrick assessed the threat and, without hesitation, moved in the direction of that threat. His friend Brendan and then Joshua immediately followed. According to reports Castillo pushed the shooter against the wall, Jones pulled him to the ground, and Bialy managed to get the gun away from him.

Jones and Castillo both sustained gunshot wounds. Eighteen year-old Castillo, however, died at the scene. Authorities arrested the two shooters. They have been charged with first-degree murder, several counts of attempted murder, and a variety of other charges related to the incident.

Kendrick Castillo was laid to rest today. He was remembered as a kind and selfless young man who consistently thought of others first. And he was acknowledged as a hero. Rightly so! When the moment presented itself, Kendrick unlocked the potential in that moment to do good and, by so doing, helped prevent what might have been a great loss of life.

Don’t expect God to check your calendar before presenting you with a moment packed with the potential to do good. Instead, ask Him for the wisdom to see the potential in that moment, even if you only have a split-second in which to do so. And then do the right thing, even if it means moving in the direction of something frightening.

Kendrick Castillo died in medias res — a Latin term that means in the middle of a story. One day, like Kendrick, each of us will die in medias res. However, our story does not have to end there. Because Kendrick’s actions saved lives, his story is forever a part of the stories of all those saved by his split-second decision.

May we too have the courage to unlock the potential of the ordinary and not so ordinary moments that present themselves to us every day.

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